No
CY
Singapore
19
Install Theme
bankuei:

yugidoe:

chiefarnook:

kiroho:

bblackgoldd:

digableplanet:

ghettoanime:

Fuck nah.

Nah yo… Fuck that

Wut

relax please

i hope this is real

This shit is killing me…

Shaolin Soccer remains the shit!

bankuei:

yugidoe:

chiefarnook:

kiroho:

bblackgoldd:

digableplanet:

ghettoanime:

Fuck nah.

Nah yo… Fuck that

Wut

relax please

i hope this is real

This shit is killing me…

Shaolin Soccer remains the shit!

(Source: yodiscrepo)

glowcloud:

i love the Women Against Feminism that are like “I dont need feminism because i can admit i need my husband to open a jar for me and thats ok!” cause listen 1. get a towel 2. get the towel damp 3. put it on the lid and twist. BAM now men are completely useless. you, too, can open a jar. time to get a divorce

(via kuunakullanvalkeana)

also THIS GIRL WITH SHORT HAIR ON THE LEFT WHAT THE FUCK. PLEASE. please PLEASE

my ovaries just FUCKING EXPLODED 

koharu sugawara is so fucking hot WTF

pepper-soup:

lol i have zero patience for kinksters who use their own past trauma as a way to downplay or dimiss someone else’s  legit fear of kink/bdsm/rape culture, i suppose i should care just as much about these people but i can’t see myself sympathising with survivors who tell other survivors to basically ‘get over it’ and that crap because whatever they do their their privacy supposedly means dangerous kinks are okay.

there’s loads of black people who will defend their racist white partners to the death before supporting each other, there’s many gay people who oppose homosexuality and actively demonize other gay people, there are several women who claim men are our superiors and believe women are the lesser sex  and (very personal one for me) so many people who dismiss my & others child abuse history because ”i got beaten too, its not a big deal, not all parents are bad” etc. basically you dont get to dismiss a person’s fear just because you deal with it in a different way

im not here for survivors or people from minority backgrounds (i dislike that word too) shitting on fellow survivors to make the perpetrator seem innocent, it’ll make survivors feel like they’re going crazy or acting dramatic which is dangerous because their feelings on their experience is comletely legitimate, no matter how many other survivors try to dismiss them. fuck off, i really dont care for these insensitive people. 

razycrandomcunt:

realniggaannouncements:

Man you know Dracula was invented by white people. Homies weakness was a seasoning, the sun and Jesus Christ

image

(via bankuei)

"Tanaka, stop making that face."

(Source: killuaw, via bleach-at-the-beach)

shamelesslyunladylike:

This animation style looks so fucking cool.

(Source: latantha)


It was really tough to make the Japanese public perceive me as a serious actor or director. As an actor, one of the first films I worked on was Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence by Nagisa Oshima, back in the early ’80s. When it was released in Japan, I sneaked into the theater to see how the audience would react. I thought the film was great and my acting was not bad at all. I anticipated that the audience would be impressed by my performance, which was completely different from my comedy persona on TV shows. However, at the moment I appeared on the screen, every single person in the theater burst out laughing. I was devastated and humiliated by the experience, because the character I played in the film was not the kind of person to be laughed at. I swore then and there that I would stick to the serious and dark characters in any films or TV dramas thereafter, and I did. And it took years of playing dark characters, serial killers, and cult gurus for Beat Takeshi to be perceived as a serious actor.
I wear a lot of hats: director, comic, and actor. They’re very different roles. I spend a lot of energy looking for acceptance in these different roles. A comic or TV star who suddenly switches to a film role playing a gangster is laughable. I had a lot of trouble making people believe that the comic Beat Takeshi could play a bad guy. In people’s minds, I’m a comic, so it took a lot of time before I was recognized as a director. I had to be patient until the public accepted me. As a result, my early films didn’t get a lot of attention. As a serious film actor, things didn’t take off, either. Only my comic talents were recognized.
Actually, it was not until around Fireworks, which was my seventh film, that I was recognized as a serious film director in Japan. For years, my films had been treated as nothing more than a comedian superstar’s hobby. Generally speaking, the Japanese tend to respect artists, entertainers, or craftsmen who are masters of one art more than a jack-of-all-trades. On top of that, they can watch my shows every night on TV for free! No one cared to pay money to watch my films on the screen. So they were preoccupied with the idea that films made by a comedian cannot be good. But the moment I won the Golden Lion for Fireworks at the Venice Film Festival, everything changed. The comedian who occasionally made films as a part-time job had turned into a “world-famous cinema maestro" almost overnight. It only proves how the Japanese are obsessively sensitive to the reaction of foreign countries.
-Takeshi Kitano
[A.V. Club]

It was really tough to make the Japanese public perceive me as a serious actor or director. As an actor, one of the first films I worked on was Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence by Nagisa Oshima, back in the early ’80s. When it was released in Japan, I sneaked into the theater to see how the audience would react. I thought the film was great and my acting was not bad at all. I anticipated that the audience would be impressed by my performance, which was completely different from my comedy persona on TV shows. However, at the moment I appeared on the screen, every single person in the theater burst out laughing. I was devastated and humiliated by the experience, because the character I played in the film was not the kind of person to be laughed at. I swore then and there that I would stick to the serious and dark characters in any films or TV dramas thereafter, and I did. And it took years of playing dark characters, serial killers, and cult gurus for Beat Takeshi to be perceived as a serious actor.

I wear a lot of hats: director, comic, and actor. They’re very different roles. I spend a lot of energy looking for acceptance in these different roles. A comic or TV star who suddenly switches to a film role playing a gangster is laughable. I had a lot of trouble making people believe that the comic Beat Takeshi could play a bad guy. In people’s minds, I’m a comic, so it took a lot of time before I was recognized as a director. I had to be patient until the public accepted me. As a result, my early films didn’t get a lot of attention. As a serious film actor, things didn’t take off, either. Only my comic talents were recognized.

Actually, it was not until around Fireworks, which was my seventh film, that I was recognized as a serious film director in Japan. For years, my films had been treated as nothing more than a comedian superstar’s hobby. Generally speaking, the Japanese tend to respect artists, entertainers, or craftsmen who are masters of one art more than a jack-of-all-trades. On top of that, they can watch my shows every night on TV for free! No one cared to pay money to watch my films on the screen. So they were preoccupied with the idea that films made by a comedian cannot be good. But the moment I won the Golden Lion for Fireworks at the Venice Film Festival, everything changed. The comedian who occasionally made films as a part-time job had turned into a “world-famous cinema maestro" almost overnight. It only proves how the Japanese are obsessively sensitive to the reaction of foreign countries.

-Takeshi Kitano

[A.V. Club]

(Source: onfilmmaking, via cerebralproxy)

Everybody else in this fuckin’ town is fallin’ in love and gettin’ engaged and havin’ babies

(Source: mickeymilkovandamn, via halilemur)